It Runs in the Blood

I could say that growing up in a small and peaceful village like Belle of Beauty and the Beast is what some people want to be. Looking back through the years of living in the village, I am convinced that such enchanted place does exist and the characters seem to fit naturally to each person I bump into. I am not talking about the real story but the setting.  As a whole, it truly does reflect the nature of living in a village – – wherein your life is usually an open book.

Alcoholics

I grew up in a small village where everybody knows each milestone of my family’s life. This was starting from my great grandparents up to my nieces and nephews … and even beyond to the new generations now. I came from a lineage of alcoholics and as far as I could remember, there was never a single day in my childhood life when I could say that my world is drunk-free. Well, my uncles and cousins are fun to be with all the time if that’s any consolation.

But why? Because the moment I wake up in the morning, they were already drunk and until I go to bed, they were still in some state of hallucination talking insensibly. I even came to thinking if time will come when I will be able to see their real selves which I haven’t — ever since I learned to walk and talk!

Time passed by and soon enough, one by one, their body gave up and went to eternal rest. But not before enduring ulcer and liver malfunction. I then learned to accept my fateful origin. Because of our family’s reputation, it greatly affected my personality and I struggled over low self-esteem and shame during my adolescence period. The bondage is still evident in my cousins’ persistent habitual drinking despite the terrible demise of our relative.  Now, it made me wonder why such simple cause-and-effect relationship is so hard to comprehend. They just shrug their shoulders and say “it runs in the blood” and so I thought that right there, I got the answer to my question.

I still remember that day when I won the price as the fastest beer drinker, people clapped their hands and said, “wow, it runs in your blood!” When my cousins were turned down in their marriage proposals, they said, “sorry, it runs in our blood.”  For so long, this reason pacifies my disappointments but not until one day, I decided to turn the table.

Standup

For the very first time in our generation, I made a stand that alcoholism is not a genetic characteristic handed over by our ancestors and something that we can merely excuse ourselves from by saying that it runs in your blood. Alcoholism is a form of addiction which is admittedly, a complex condition.  It is a brain disease that needs to be cured, like heart illness and cancer which is almost impossible to do alone. And thus, it requires lots of moral support from surrounding people. It may be a burden to us having alcoholics around but we need to show empathy and help them ultimately make the stand like I – and then my other relatives soon thereafter – thankfully did.